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My weekly art update...

work in progress,
I have little to show for, this week. I dedicated a good amount of time to a painting that I just ended up tearing to pieces. It  feels good when you know it's not working. I get a little upset but I also move on.
I began working on a sunflower painting yesterday. I have never painted one and hope the sunny colors will bring me better results! This time I've gone back to my normal cold press paper, I'm taking a break from hot press for a while.
The lesson I learned this week: when trying new things, don't try too many new things at once or it will lead to frustration. When trying new paper, buy the smallest size available so you are not stuck with too much unwanted paper like I did.

Better photo of last weeks painting, I took this in the morning as opposed to the afternoon. The colors are closer to the original.

Comments

  1. Good morning Celia!
    Okay my dear friend! Your watercolors are great! You are one fantastic and rocking watercolorist! I love the colors, the fluidity, the movement, spontaneity,and so much more! You are so very creative! Your work is exciting and very dramatic! I love both these works. I love seeing the "work in progress!"
    So keep on making great art and posting for all the world to enjoy Celia!
    Take care!
    Abbracci!
    Ciao!
    Michael

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    Replies
    1. Michael, I will save this comment and read it every time I'm feeling down! A big hug to you too!

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  2. Hi Celia,
    Your sunflowers are looking great as is the other painting. On occasion I have also tore up a painting that I just didn't feel could be rescued. There is something cathartic about tossing the bits into the trash. More often, I put it away for a few weeks and if I still can't see it working, I use the backside as test paper for my paints. I always keep a piece by my paints when I'm working. We learn as much or more from our mistakes! Keep painting and sharing!

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  3. I have had one of those weeks Celia, I don't often tear up paintings these days but put them aside for reflection but every now and then it feels great to shred one and get rid of the evidence. Your sunflowers will be great

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  4. It's so frustrating when you have to tear works up...makes you doubt yourself:-( But the sunflower looks very good to me , will surely be a great work ! How different the colors are from the morning photo of your last post ! Have a nice sunday Celia.

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  5. What a difference in colours between the two photos. This one looks so much more vibrant. Love your sunflowers too!

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  6. Great colors and brush strokes. I hope you painted on the back sides of your paintings that you did not like. Sometimes I get a good painting and then I have the ugly duckling on the back. Also, you would be amazed at how you feel about the ugly ducklings in a week or even a year. Sometimes I put them in a drawer and when I am looking for something else, I find an ugly duckling and my opinion may have changed. Just the other day I stumbled upon one of my disasterous State Fair paintings and thought it wasn't so bad after all. I clearly saw what I did not like and was able to sort of correct it. But, I learned for sure that I don't like dark darks in my paintings as was in the ugly Fair painting.

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  7. Ciao Celia, a me sembra che il tuo girasole stia progredendo molto bene, quando finito sarà un eccellente acquerello. Abbraccio.

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  8. Celia your sunflowers are looking beautiful. I don't even want to think how many paintings I have torn up or put on the shelf because I went too far.... my mentor told me to hold onto the bad ones because I would look back and see my mistakes as well as perhaps how to fix them. Good advice but I don't always follow it because sometimes I just want to toss it and start all over. Looks like these sunflowers will be a keeper. Take care and have a wonderful day.

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  9. Hi Celia! I do like the cooler version of your bottom painting. A diffferent feeling but still gorgeous.
    I'm curious to know what it is you don't like about hot press paper ! I must say I have never painted on that type of paper to my recollection. What's different than other types of paper? Hugs and have a nice weekend.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Helen, I haven't had much experience myself but the paper I was using soaked the pigment, like a sponge. It didn't allow for the paint to flow. I tried adding a wash, it left odd spot marks. It is impossible to work with. I think, I might have painted on the wrong side of the paper because I have used the paper twice already with okay results. I will try it again and let you know, but I prefer cold press by far! Hugs to you too!

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